new press release on GPS market forecast

According to a press release that came out yesterday shipment of GPS and location based services will grow at a compound annual rate of 15% during the next three years which will add up to 1 billion units by 2015.

Since countries other than US are deploying their own satellite based navigation systems such as Japan, China, and India GPS technology is expected to be embraced at a higher rate in these regions.

The study suggests most of the boost in this segment will come from smartphone based GPS systems as it was established within the past years.

Uses of GPS technology is very wide which includes academic, business, aviation, maritime, construction, scientific, weather and various other fields.

Garmin Fenix

Garmin came out with a new GPS watch called Garmin Fenix. It’s expected to hit the market this coming August and cost somewhere around $400. Some of the highlights of Garmin Fenix, in addition to the GPS receiver of course, is the compass, altimeter, barometer, and the optional external ANT connected temperature sensor. Some other features include the ability to plan trips and create routes, record waypoints, and record GPS bread crumb trails. You can also navigate to coordinates if you wish. You also get a 3-axis electronic compass to get your heading even when you’re stationary.

Fenix, which is water proof to 50 meters can last 50 hours in GPS mode and up to 6 weeks in plain watch mode.

See Garmin’s mini site here.

NAVSOP


A new system have been developed to protect military vehicles from GPS jamming by using already existing radio waves to locate rather than relying on GPS satellite signals. The system uses cell phone, Wifi, and TV signals to locate a person or a vehicle but can even use GPS jamming signals to correctly get a position fix.

The system is developed by BAE Systems and it intends to keep military drones safe from GPS spoofing attacks which we recently mentioned here on Navigadget.

Known as NAVSOP, this technology scavenges radio signals from the air and can work indoors or even underground where wimpy GPS satellite signals can’t reach. This technology could replace GPS in the future.